Atlantic City Regulators Attempting To Clean Up Casinos

Atlantic City Regulators Attempting To Clean Up Casinos
Atlantic City casinos have seen a sharp drop in revenue over the past few years since the economic recession. The casinos have been dealing with older facilities, increased competition from neighboring states, and an increase in some of the unsavory practices that have taken place in the city.Now, Regulators are doing their part to ensure that AC casinos remain the top of the line when it comes to service and reputation. In recent years, prostitution and crime have become commonplace in the casinos, and regulators are cracking down on these gambling deterrents.The Division of Gaming Enforcement has stepped up efforts to clean out the casinos by increasing the amount of people that have been blacklisted. The group that used to be filled with mobsters, now has been streamlined ton include prostitutes and other casino patrons that are giving the casinos, and the city, a bad name within the gaming industry.”What we’re trying to do is deter people from engaging in bad behavior,” said Tourism District Commander Thomas Gilbert.Although the efforts have increased, there were still less than two dozen people blacklisted last year. That number appears like it will be surpassed in 2012. Already this year, five people have been blacklisted, and an additional seventeen are waiting for their cases to be heard by regulators.”We have no choice but to clean up the casinos,” says longtime Atlantic City resident Tony Flacone. “Pennsylvania is taking all of our gamblers, and Macau has taken the high rollers. So if we want to keep the business we have here, people need to know that Atlantic City is not a slimy place to visit.”Another reason for the crackdown is the amount of law enforcement officials that it has taken the past few years to answer calls from the casinos. The regulators’ efforts are geared towards lowering the amount of police officers needed to oversee the AC casinos, which would in turn, lower the amount of money taxpayers are contributing towards these efforts.New Jersey has fallen behind Pennsylvania in terms of overall gaming revenue, and with New York and Massachusetts authorizing new casinos, New Jersey could fall further down the revenue list in the coming years. AC officials are hoping the crackdown, along with the new Revel Casino, will help bring gamblers back to a place that was once considered the East Coast version of Las Vegas. May 5, 2012Posted By Terry GoodwinStaff Editor, CasinoGamblingWeb.comSubmit News!